3×3 inches on 1.5 inch deep cradled hardboard.  Acrylic painting with acrylic extrusion, retroreflective glass media, mica flakes and metal powder.

Little Froth, 3 x 3 inches, mixed media seascape usiong acrylic painting techniques, glass acrylic extrusion, metal powder and mica
Little Froth, 3 x 3 inches, mixed media seascape usiong acrylic painting techniques, glass acrylic extrusion, metal powder and mica

 

Notes:

3×3 inches on 1.5 inch deep cradled hardboard.  Acrylic painting with acrylic extrusion, retroreflective glass media, mica flakes and metal powder.

On deep cradled hardboard with painted edges. Wired for hanging (or just display it self-standing). I have included photos from several different light angles in direct and diffuse light to give a better feel for “little Froth”‘s light manipulating properties.

“Little Froth” is an acrylic and mixed media piece using glass spheres (“beads” of various sizes and extruded acrylic painting medium. These techniques and materials are combined to depict a foamy breaking waves and sea froth. The use of glass and extruded acrylic media creates a detailed and lightweight three dimensional appearance. Acrylic gel media dry transparent when untinted or when lightly tinted with transparent paint colors. The deep clear tangled acrylic forms from extrusion pick up the light reflected, magnified and lensed by the glass spheres. The overall effect is a sparkling, sometimes softly glowing, changeable piece that reacts to the light and to the viewer’s position with patterns of light and movement that capture the essence of moving water.

I have often been vexed by paintings that can only be viewed under very specific lighting and viewing conditions. I hate glare, but how does one create shiny transparency in a flat work without glare? I have developed my own three dimensional non-flat painting techniques and ways of working with light manipulating media. These techniques allow me to use the light coming into the painting from different angles to create movement and presence instead of glare.

The “use all the light directions” approach really lends itself to depictions of seascapes. Water is not static and it has fairly complex optical properties. Rather than using little brush marks to approximate a static slice of space and time, the use of transparency, controlled three dimensional patterns, and light manipulating media combine to depict the depth and movement of water in a charming and compelling manner.

 

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Purchase this original piece through Artfinder (click the image below).  Please use the contact form at the bottom of this post to inquire about giclee prints or similar pieces.

 

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